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Your Heart Health: Physical Fitness and Mortality

exrcise future

One need not be a marathon runner or an elite athlete to derive significant benefits from physical activity. In fact, the Surgeon General’s physical activity recommendations seem surprisingly modest. One reason for this is that the greatest gains in terms of mortality are achieved when an individual goes from being sedentary to becoming moderately active. Studies show that less is gained when an individual goes from being moderately active to very active. In a study performed among US veterans, subjects were classified into 5 categories according to fitness level. The largest gains in terms of mortality were achieved between the lowest fitness group and the next lowest fitness group. The researchers studied 6213 men over a 6-year period and compared the risks of death (after allowing for age adjustment) by gradients of physical fitness.6 

The Figure shows the relative risks associated with the different categories (1 to 5, lowest to highest) of fitness measured. Healthy adults who are the least fit have a mortality risk that is 4.5 times that of the most fit. Surprisingly, an individual’s fitness level was a more important predictor of death than established risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. This study, along with others, underscores the fact that fitness and daily activity levels have a strong influence on the incidence of heart disease and overall mortality.Clearly exercise is an important strategy to stay healthy now and in the future. 

There is a lot of individual not exercising due to pain, weight or fear of injuries. If you are one of those contact us to determing how to take care of your pain, weight and evaluate how healthy you are. If you have question contact us and also for more informatin go to www.proholisticchiropractic.com/services

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Dr. Edgardo Vargas

Pro-Holistic Care

Reference:

Circulation - http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/107/1/e2 - 

Exercise andCardiovascular health.  


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